Why You Shouldn’t Let Your Sales Momentum Go To Waste


In one of my previous articles I highlighted how the art of the close is often in the momentum that you create in the sale. He who builds sales momentum the closer they get to the sales finish line is more likely to make the sale. If you missed this article you can find it here:

https://sales-icon.com/2019/02/13/how-to-close-more-sales-by-building-momentum/

 

In this article I’m going to build on this point and highlight with an example that I witnessed a couple of months ago.

 

I was working with an experienced sales person, he had twenty years’ experience in sales and in telecoms. He was incredibly proficient, he understood the solution he was selling like second nature, he was great with the customer and he was rather captivating too. All sounds very promising!

 

One lesson he hadn’t learnt though, despite his experience, was the law of momentum.

 

We met with a prospect, whom he was proposing a new phone solution for. He had met with them on numerous occasions and had done a great job thus far. He’d understood their pains and the pleasure state they desired to get to. He had conducted numerous activities to gain their buy in, for instance he had the phone vendor demo their solution on a webinar with the buyer. He had setup a trial for them to get hands on experience of the solution. He had even gone to the trouble of arranging for the buyer to go to the vendors offices to see how they operate and the systems that they had in place.

 

If you’d written a playbook of how to successfully win the sale, then this salesman had up to this point followed it to a tee.

 

He was in such a good position that the prospect had based his budget on the solution. So at this stage the salesman was in the prime spot for making the sale.

 

Trouble was that the final decision wasn’t yet to be made for another six months. What happened next? Well you can probably assume where I am going with this. The salesman neglected this opportunity from here on in. I found out that in this six month final window, all he did was call the customer once, a month before the final decision was to be made, and at that point in time he refreshed the pricing in his proposal.



He had done all of the hard work already, yet he just left the opportunity in the lap of the gods, in the hope that he had already done enough to close the sale. He was about to learn a very valuable yet painful lesson on the law of momentum.

 

What happened was that a competitor got in with the prospect in this final six months and they built some momentum of their own and won the deal.

 

Now had this salesman just conducted some additional activity in the final six months they would have maintained their momentum and ring fenced the sale.

 

 

We at Sales Icon Coaching preach about how the key to closing sales is your activity. In that the best approach is to have consistency of activity and use those activities that carry the most weight (level of influence).

 

But the thing to remember is the law of momentum. To effectively sell we must strive to maintain momentum, the more time that passes the more our momentum dissipates. If enough time passes then any momentum that you have built will be all but lost and we’ll lose the sale.

 

So with that in mind, we must be conscious that the timing of activities is key.

 

The take away for you is to

  • Ramp up your activities the closer you come to the sales decision

 

Don’t make the mistake this salesman made. If you’ve invested time in an opportunity then don’t let that momentum be wasted, maintain and build upon it the closer you come to the sales decision and you’ll get the successful outcome you desire.

 

For more assistance my article below on ‘how effective timing of activities closes more deals’ should be of use to you also:

 

https://sales-icon.com/2018/12/03/how-effective-timing-of-activities-closes-more-deals/

 

As always, if you need any further advice then please do get in touch. Good luck creating sales momentum!


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